plantar pressure distribution |smart insole

The purpose of this study was to determine the plantar pressure distribution in adult subjects suffering from flexible flat foot, high arched foot and diabetic foot without neuropathy versus normal using a pedobarograph. The plantar pressure of foot distribution regarding flexible flat foot, high arched foot and diabetic foot without neuropathy and normal subjects was measured during static and walking in each subject during normal walking speed. Sixty male subjects contributed in this study divided into four groups, the first group is flexible flat foot, the second group is high arched foot, the third group is diabetic foot without neuropathy, and the fourth group is the control or normal subjects. Time series pressure measurements for all sensors were grouped into five anatomical areas of human foot. In normal subjects, the hind foot (heel) was the first part of the foot receiving the weight bearing of the body. Then it moved to the toe through the midfoot and the metatarsal area. The highest mean pressure in normal subjects was found posterior in the hind foot under the heel and then anterior under the metatarsal heads. The lowest pressure distribution was under the cuboid bone. The highest mean plantar pressure distribution in the flat foot subjects was found under cuboid bone compared to normal subjects. The highest mean plantar pressure distribution in the high arched foot subjects or pes cavus was lower under all parts of foot. The highest mean of plantar pressure distribution in the diabetic foot without neuropathy was found under both forefoot and rear foot.

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